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Officer Separation and Enhanced Selective Early Retirement Boards

seperation boards

Nearly 19,000 active-duty captains and majors in the Army Competitive Category will go before either an Officer Separation Board or Enhanced Selective Early Retirement Board early this year.

The OSB and eSERB will evaluate the eligible captain and major populations by year group and will select from as little as 5 percent to as much as 18 percent of specific considered year groups originally overassessed to support a much larger force.

The Army will select the minimum number for separation that will allow the force to meet congressionally mandated end strength, officials said, with this year's board directing separation for up to 2,000 officers.

Beginning in March 2014, about 9,735 captains will go before an OSB. About 699 captains will face an eSERB. Captains going before these boards come from year groups 2006, 2007 and 2008.

Beginning in April, about 6,943 majors will be decided by an OSB, and 1,504 by an eSERB. Majors going before these boards come from year groups 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002 and 2003.

Dave Martino, director of Officer Personnel Management Directorate at Human Resources Command, said the Army's drawdown plan is a "balanced approach that maintains readiness while trying to minimize turbulence to the officer corps."

The reductions in the officer force are meant to coincide with the reduction in Army force structure, he said. "As the structure reduces in size, the Army officer corps will make a requisite reduction relative to that structure."

He also said the OSB and eSERB will separate "fully qualified and officers who have rendered quality service to the nation. Therefore, we will execute the OSB and eSERB with precision, care and compassion."

Click here to read more.

Officer Separation Board Eligibility


Active-competitive category captains from year groups 2006 to 2008 meeting the following criteria will be in this board:

  • Have a date of rank of Jan. 29, 2009, to July 14, 2012
  • Have at least one year of active duty time in grade
  • Have less than 18 years of AFS at time the board convenes
  • Currently not on a promotion list to major

Active-competitive category majors from year groups 1999-2003 meeting the following criteria will be in this board:

  • Have a date of rank of Oct. 2, 2008, to April 29, 2013
  • Have at least one year of active duty time in grade
  • Have less than 18 years of AFS at time board convenes
  • Currently not on a promotion list to lieutenant colonel

Enhance Selective Early Retirement Board Eligibility


ACC captains from year groups 2006 to 2008 meeting the following criteria will be in this board:

  • Have a date of rank of Jan. 29, 2009, to July 14, 2012
  • Have at least one year of active duty time in grade
  • Have 18 years or more of AFS at time board convenes
  • Currently not on a promotion list to major

ACC majors from year groups 1999-2003 meeting the following criteria will be in this board:

  • Have a date of rank of Oct. 2, 2008, to April 29, 2013
  • Have at least one year of active duty time in grade
  • Have less than 18 years AFS at time board convenes
  • Currently not on a promotion list to lieutenant colonel

Board Preparation


Eligible officers should:

  • Conduct a professional self-assessment of their official file
  • Ensure appropriate documents are present and consistent
  • Meet with their chain of command

Battalion and brigade commanders should:

  • Ensure eligible officers understand the OSB or eSERB populations
  • Provide candid feedback on performance and potential
  • Address potential for future service
  • Advise potential risk of selection for involuntary separation

File Assessment


Assesment tips:

  • Officers are responsible for reviewing their board files for completeness and accuracy
  • HRC will not scrub all OSB files, rather, provide officers the information they need to scrub their own file
  • OSB will review all restricted files
  • Brigade S1s will have access to iPERMS and officer’s official records

How to conduct the file assessment:

  • Review your Department of the Army official photo for proper military presence and appearance. Ensure your uniform is correct and fits properly.
  • Review the officer records brief, or ORB
  • Review documents in the official record. Cross-check with entries on the ORB.
OERs most clearly communicate an officer’s manner of performance and potential to a selection board. Other documents (DA photo, ORB, academic evaluation reports and awards) help to complete the picture.
A trend of below-average performance places an officer at risk for promotion and retention.

Derogatory information in a file increases the officer’s risk for retention and reduces the officer’s potential. The OSB and eSERB will review documents in the restricted file. (See MILPER Zone Announcement for specific information.)

Examples of derogatory information include (not all-inclusive):

  • Punitive or administrative letters of reprimand, admonition or censure
  • Article 15 or other Uniform Code of Military Justice actions
  • Promotion list removal documents

Assessing Risk and File Strength


Officers need to understand that a trend of below-average performance may risk their promotion or retention potential.

Generally, the strength of an officer’s record and risk for selection by the OSB or eSERB can be made by answering the following questions. The questions are not all-inclusive. Other elements of the officer’s record (DA photo, ORB and other documents in the record) will influence the level of risk and shape a holistic assessment of the officer.

1. Does your record contain a Below Center of Mass, or BCOM, OER, a non-left justified OER, referred OER or derogatory information (Article 15, GOMOR, etc.)?
- If so, the risk for selection by the OSB or eSERB is HIGH
- Note: non-left justified OERs are those with a box checked in Part V (a) as something other than “Outstanding, Must Promote” or in Part V-II (a) as something other than “Best Qualified.” Referred OERs are those marked as such in Part II (d).

2. Are all of the OERs box-checked Center of Mass (COM) by the Senior Rater?
– If so, the risk for selection by the OSB or eSERB is MEDIUM

3. Is there a mix of Above Center of Mass (ACOM) and COM reports in your record?
– If so, the risk for selection by the OSB or eSERB is LOW
– COM reports must possess strong enumeration and recommendation for future promotion and attendance to higher level schooling potential.

4. Are all the OERs from Key Developmental, or KD, assignments COM reports?
– If so, the risk for selection by the OSB or eSERB is MEDIUM
– Performance in KD assignments weigh heavily in the assessment of performance and potential. COM reports in KD must reflect strong enumeration and recommendation for future promotion and attendance to higher level schooling potental.

Post-Board Notification


  • Officers selected for OSB and eSERB will be personally notified.
  • Expected notification will occur June 14.
  • No list will be publicly released.

iPERMS Access (G-1/S-1s)



To gain access for users who have current iPERMS access:

  • Send a request to usarmy.knox.hrc.mbx.iperms-accounts@mail.mil with “iPERMS Evaluations Access Request” as the subject line.

  • The request can be sent either in a memorandum format signed by the G1, or via email from the G1.
    1. Name
    2. Rank
    3. AKO ID (AKO email address)
    4. Unit
    5. List of assigned and downtrace Unit Identification Codes, or UICs

  • Click here for a recommended format.

  • For users who DO NOT have current iPERMS access:
    1. a. Complete DD Form 2875, System Authorization Access Request. See information at https://www.hrc.army.mil/TAGD/iPERMS%20Access.
    2. b. Submit the DD 2875 via memorandum or email as outlined above.

  • 3. Recommend you submit one consolidated request, division level or above, in order to assist with processing the access requests as rapidly as possible.

  • Contact Human Resources Command points of contact at 502-613-8984 or 502-613-8983 if you have any questions with iPERMS access.

Frequently Asked Questions

Why does the Army need to hold an OSB/eSERB?

The OSB and eSERB are necessary to meet future force structure requirements. A reduction of officer billets in the future force structure combined with captain year groups accessed to support a significantly larger force structure, high promotion selection rates to major and high retention rates within both grades have caused officer imbalances and overages to support future requirements. The Army’s drawdown plan is a balanced approach that maintains readiness while trying to minimize turbulence within the officer corps. The OSB and eSERB are integral parts of this plan and are based on congressionally mandated strength reductions and severely restricted budgets.

Where can I get more information?

Visit the Army's Human Resource website, www.hrc.army.mil. You can also consult MILPER messages 13-356 and 13-357; contact your assignment officer or meet with your battalion and brigade leadership.

Can I verify what documents in my file the board will review?

A. Yes, the "My Board File” website allows you to review and certify documents going in front of the board. Link: https://www.hrcapps.army.mil/portal/default.aspx?page=active.record.mbf

The “My Board File” website is only accessible during the following periods:

  • CPT Year Group 2008, 11 Dec 13 – 25 Feb 14
  • CPT Year Group 2007, 12 Dec 13 – 26 Feb 14
  • CPT Year Group 2006, 13 Dec 13 – 27 Feb 14
  • MAJ Year Group 1999, YG 2000 and YG 2001, 19 Jan 14 – 14 Apr 14
  • MAJ Year Group 2002 and YG 2003, 20 Jan 14 – 21 Apr 14
When will the OSB/eSERB meet?

The Fiscal Year 2014 OSB and eSERB will convene in March 2014 for captains and April 2014 for majors. Specific criteria for the various considered populations are listed in MILPER Message 13-356 (captains) and 13-357 (majors) available at www.hrc.army.mil.

Who is being considered by the OSB/eSERB?

Army competitive category captains in year groups 2006, 2007 and 2008 with a date of rank to captain of Jan. 29, 2009, to July 14, 2012, and majors in year groups 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002 and 2003 with a date of rank of Oct. 2, 2008, to April 29, 2013 (convene date of latest major OSB and eSERB), who have served at least one year active duty in the grade currently held as of the convene date of the board unless they are on a recommended list for promotion or are separating or retiring from the Army with an effective date prior to the convene date of the board.

How were these specific year groups selected?

Year groups were selected based on eligibility requirements established by law, the year group’s projected inventory, future Army requirements and the amount of time officers in the selected year groups have served on active duty (at least six years active federal commissioned service as of the expected secretary of the Army’s mandatory separation date.

What options are available to officers in the considered population?

Since the statute governing OSB and eSERB does not provide an exemption clause for those officers meeting the considered population eligibility criteria, any officer in the considered population not separated or retired from the Army by the convene date of the board will remain in the considered population. Officers may continue to request unqualified resignations and submit voluntary retirement applications. However, if the effective separation or retirement date is after the convene date of the board, they will remain in the considered population. There are also no monetary incentives for those in the considered population to retire or resign in lieu of the OSB/eSERB.

What action(s) should officers in the affected population take prior to the board?

Officers in the considered population should conduct a self-assessment of their Army Military Human Resource Records, or AMHRR, to ensure the appropriate documents are present and consistent throughout. Discuss your file with your chain of command to determine if there is information you should provide to complete your file.

Will OCS officers selected by the OSB retire as an officer?

A. Officers in the OSB who reach 18 yrs Active Federal Service (AFS) prior to the MRD established by the board, will be allowed to continue to serve until they reach 20 yrs AFS IAW USC TITLE X. Officers are still required to have 10 years Active Federal Commissioned Service (AFCS) to retire as an Officer. USC TITLE X section 3911 allows officers with at least 8 years AFCS on the date of their retirement to request a waiver to the 10 yr AFCS requirement. The authority to grant the waiver is currently held at the Assistant Secretary of the Army. Each case will be evaluated on an individual basis and will be approved or denied based on its individual merits. While there is no guarantee of waiver approval, it is expected that provided the officer has served honorably in the grade of CPT, the waiver will be supported. HRC is working with G1 and the ASA(M&RA) to codify and disseminate the process to be used by officers to quickly obtain the waiver of AFCS. In addition, HRC is seeking a delegation of authority from the G1 and ASA(M&RA) to expedite the process.

What is a file assessment?

A file assessment is a review of all documents within an officer’s official record to give the reviewer an idea of the officer’s experience, education, and level of demonstrated performance and potential. It is every officer’s personal responsibility to manage his/her AMHRR and conduct periodic file self-assessments/reviews of the ORB, DA photo and OERs. Visit HRC’s OSB information page for additional information at https://www.hrc.army.mil

Where can officers find more information about their file?

Officers are encouraged to discuss their file with immediate supervisors, mentors, human resource managers and/or assignment officers.

What documents in an officer’s official file will the OSB/eSERB review?

The OSB will review an officer’s performance in the AMHRR, which will include access to the Restricted (R) portion of the AMHRR, the officer record brief, or ORB, the official photograph and OERs, to include previously masked reports.


The documents on the AMHRR, including those in the restricted portion that will be seen by the board, may include the following:

1. Article 15 or other UCMJ actions received as an enlisted member or as an officer that have not been set aside by proper authority. However, punishment under Article 15 or other UCMJ actions in a Soldier’s early career (specialist/corporal and below with fewer than three years of service) will not be considered in deliberation.

2. DA Suitability and Evaluation Board, or DASEB, filing of unfavorable information.

3. Promotion list removal documents when the officer is removed from the list.

4. Punitive or administrative letters of reprimand, admonition or censure.

If officers find deficiencies in their AMRR, how should they make corrections?

When a deficiency is discovered, the first stop should always be the unit S1 or servicing Military Personnel Division, or MPD. Specific questions or issues that are beyond an S1’s ability to answer should be brought to the attention of the assignment officer.

What regulations can assist with a self-assessment/review of an AMHRR?

Regulations directly related to the AMHRR, and in particular, the ORB and DA photo can be accessed at: http://www.apd.army.mil/. The applicable regulations include the following:

  • AR 600-8-22, Military Awards
  • AR 640-30, Photographs for Military Personnel Files
  • AR 670-1, Wear and Appearance of Army Uniforms and Insignia
  • AR 640-1, Officer’s Guide to the Officer Record Brief
  • MILPER Message 12-171

If an officer is selected by the eSERB, what is the maximum amount of time they will have before being separated?

If selected for early retirement by the eSERB, officers will be retired on a date determined by the secretary of the Army for separation. For planning purposes, this date will not be earlier than the first day of the ninth month following the secretary of the Army’s approval of the board report (expected to be in June 2014) unless the officer requests an earlier retirement date. For example, if the secretary of the Army approves the eSERB board report in June 2014, the first day of the ninth month would be March 1, 2015. In accordance with 10 USC § 632(a) 3, officers with at least 18, but less than 20 years of active service, may elect to remain on active duty until retirement eligible under 10 USC § 3911 at 20 years of AFS, regardless of selection for separation by the board. AFS must be verified through a service computation completed by a supporting retirement services officer or military personnel division. If service computation indicates less than 18 years or more of AFS as of the first day of the ninth month following the secretary of the Army’s approval of the board report, or the officer decides not to remain on active duty IAW with 10 USC § 632(a) 3, the officer may request retirement under Temporary Early Retirement Authority, or TERA. To qualify for TERA, applicants must have at least 15 years but less than 20 years of AFS and be otherwise eligible in accordance with Army Directive 2013-14. As retirement under the provision of TERA is voluntary, any unearned portions of monetary incentives (i.e. tuition assistance and bonuses) will be recouped in accordance with Defense Finance and Accounting Service regulations.

If an officer has a previously approved voluntary retirement request but is selected by the eSERB, when does the officer have to retire?

Officers with approved voluntary retirement requests who are selected for early retirement may retire at their previously approved effective date if that date is earlier than the mandatory retirement date determined by the secretary of the Army.

How many years of Active Federal Commission Service, or AFCS, does an officer need to retire as a commissioned officer?

Current authorities (10 USC § 3911; 30 Jan 13 USD P&R Memorandum) require an officer to have served eight years AFCS to retire as a commissioned officer. Click here to read more.

If an officer is selected by the OSB, what is the maximum amount of time the officer will have before being separated?

An officer selected by the OSB will be separated from the Army on a date that will be determined by the secretary of the Army. For planning purposes, that date will not be earlier than the first day of the ninth month following the approval of the boards’ reports (expected to be in June 2014). For example, if the secretary of the Army approves the OSB board report in June 2014, the first day of the ninth month would be March 1, 2015. Selected officers may request an earlier separation date. Officers selected for separation by the OSB who will have 15 or more years (180 months) of active federal service and less than 20 years (240 months) AFS as of the date of mandatory separation, may request retirement under Temporary Early Retirement Authority, or TERA. To qualify for TERA, officers must have at least 15 years but less than 20 years of AFS and be otherwise eligible in accordance with Army Directive 2013-14. As retirement under the provision of TERA is voluntary, any unearned portions of monetary incentives (i.e. tuition assistance and bonuses) will be recouped in accordance with Defense Finance and Accounting Service regulations.

If an officer is selected by the OSB, what is the maximum amount of time an officer could potentially have for leave?

In accordance with ALARACT 022/2013 - Announcement of Extension of the 75 Day Leave Carry Over Through 30 September 2015 – Soldiers may carry forward 75 days of annual accrued leave through September 30, 2015.

What if the officer has an Active Duty Service Obligation and is selected for separation?

Separation by force shaping centralized selection processes take priority over ADSOs. ADSOs will be waived. However, if retirement under the provisions of TERA is selected, any unearned portions of monetary incentives will be recouped.

If an officer is selected by the OSB to separate and doesn’t qualify for TERA or a regular retirement, does the officer qualify for separation pay?

In accordance with 10 USC § 1174, an officer who is involuntarily separated and has more than six years AFS, but less than 20 years AFS is entitled to separation pay. In order to receive separation pay, the officer must enter into an agreement to serve in a reserve status for a period of not less than 36 months. If the officer still has a military service obligation or MSO, then the 36 month period will begin on the day after the officer completes their MSO.

If officers are entitled to separation pay, how much will they receive?

Separation pay is outlined in the DODFMR Volume 7A, Chapter 35, paragraph 350201. It is approximately 10 percent of your monthly base pay x 12 x number of years of service. For a more refined calculation, see your local finance office.

Will officers selected by the OSB be afforded the opportunity to revert to warrant officer or enlisted status?

If selected by the OSB, an officer with prior enlisted service in the regular Army has a statutory entitlement to revert to enlisted status in the enlisted grade held before becoming an officer (10 USC § 3258). The officer must submit a request for unqualified resignation for the purpose of re-enlistment in accordance with Army Regulation 600-8-24, chapter 3-7. There is no statutory entitlement for an officer to revert to warrant officer; however, the officer may submit a request for consideration for warrant appointment.

picture of Gen. David G. Perkins, TRADOC Commanding General
"“After accepting the TRADOC colors, I understand the responsibility placed in my rucksack. As we design the Army, we also design the future of our nation, and that is a responsibility I will not take lightly.”"
DAVID G. PERKINS
General, U.S. Army
Commanding